Automatic Voter Registration
 

This page contains general information on Automatic Voter Registration: why we need it, how it works, which states have passed it
or are in process, how localities in non-AVR states can begin to use AVR regionally, and how to work to pass AVR in your state. 

 

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Oregon. Alaska. D.C. California. Georgia. 
West Virginia. Colorado. Vermont. Illinois. Washington! Maryland! New Jersey! Massachusetts!

We'll have what they're having.

 
 

Why We Need It

THE CASE FOR AUTOMATIC VOTER REGISTRATION


This is a position paper by the Brennan Center on why Automatic Voter Registration makes so much sense.  The Brennan Center, located at NYU Law School, is one of the best legal institutes in the country on voting.  They keep a page on Automatic Voter Registration that's pretty up-to-date in terms of tracking initiatives state-by-state.  Automatic Voter Registration, which could add 50 million voters to the rolls, is their signature proposal.  



AVR in Two Minutes Flat: 

How it Works for Voters

 
 

Automatic Voter Registration:
Oregon's Impressive Results

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INTERVIEW WITH JEANNE ATKINS, FORMER SEC'Y OF STATE OF OREGON

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Oregon was the first state to adopt AVR.  In this WBUR interview, Jeanne Atkins, the former Secretary of State of Oregon, talks about its extraordinary results there. 

 

How Localities Can Begin to
Register Voters Automatically

 

WORKING WITH LOCAL AGENCIES TO ADOPT AVR

 

In states that haven't adopted AVR, activists can lobby local governmental
agencies to begin to do so.  This isn't as hard as it seems, as all agencies
are required to harvest voter registration contact data.  NYC registers voters at 25 city agencies.